Cheryl blossom dating site


She’s one of the most polarizing figures in the small and (not so) sleepy town of Riverdale.And while Cheryl Blossom, played by Madelaine Petsch, is without a doubt one of the more fiery, narcissistic, and sassy individuals to grace the hallways of Riverdale High, she’s a lot more fragile than many in the town would believe.As the show continues to dig deeper into the collective psyche of the town, and indeed its central players, much has been made of Betty Cooper’s struggle with mental health – Lili Reinhart herself has even spoken up about her own struggles with depression and anxiety.However, Cheryl’s mental state has never been more than a vehicle to get her character from one plot twist to another, and some fans are slightly perturbed by this.It’s fair to say that most of the time the character makes it really hard to empathize with her, but on the flip side there are heart-wrenching snippets and grimace-inducing scenes that make your heart go out to the youngest Blossom.One focus of Cheryl’s backstory and growth as a character has been her relationship with her dead twin brother Jason and her parents.



But one thing that’s for sure, Cheryl’s mental health is not all that healthy at the moment.In fact, Madelaine even admitted that the abuse her character suffers from her parents affects her deeply; hence her intense relationship with Jason.Recently she spoke to You Tuber Shane Dawson about the raft of conspiracies surrounding Riverdale, and as she dispelled the twin-cest theory about the Blossom kids once more she also delved a little deeper into her character’s mental state.‘Well we kind of got into that a little more in the second series, it’s more so that Cheryl is abused by her parents,’ she explained.

‘So he’s kind of like her saving grace and he’s the only one who’s ever shown her love.

It’s more about the fact she’s never been love by her parents.’ This is something that is becoming so clear in series two, and fans of Netflix and The CW’s hit teen drama have been keen to point out that the character is in real distress.